HRV Monitoring Podcast Episode

About a month ago I had  the pleasure of being interviewed on the Quantified Body Podcast. In the interview we touch on a variety of topics including:

  • HRV basics
  • HRV recording methodology (duration, position, etc.)
  • Smart Phone Apps
  • Data analysis and interpretation
  • Practical Applications
  • Monitoring athletes
  • Current research projects
  • Misconceptions and common errors
  • Future directions
  • Etc. 

You can listen to the podcast from the Quantified Body website here.

There is a list of the names and resources mentioned within the episode on the Quantified Body web page. 

Your feedback is welcome.

 

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About hrvtraining

I hold an MS in Exercise Science and am a CSCS with the NSCA. I"m currently working in the Human Performance Lab at Auburn University (Montgomery) completing several research projects on HRV and exercise. I will be pursuing a PhD in Human Performance this Fall (2014) at the University of Alabama. Formerly, I worked as an assistant strength and conditioning coach at Cal U in PA. I have an extensive athletic background including hockey, rugby and collegiate football. I now compete in raw powerlifting and was the 2010 Canadian National Champion (amateur). I am interested in all aspects of strength and conditioning however my research interest pertains to heart rate variability and its application to monitoring the training of athletes.
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2 Responses to HRV Monitoring Podcast Episode

  1. David X Johnson says:

    A very interesting (and validating) interview.

    I was doing the same: 3 weeks on (strength training) followed by 1 week deload and came to the same conclusion after a few months of HRV tracking. I found that I can dispense with the planned deload by incorporating a self-regulating mechanism (based partly on HRV). This made it possible to do back-to-back cycles where deloads are forced (due to a bad HRV trend) rather than planned.

    Also, I found resting heart rate useful in confirming a low HRV score. HRV has a lot a variability whereas RHR is relatively steady. When I have a high RHR (bad) and a low HRV reading (also bad), I know that I need to take it easy with the lifting or forgo that lifting session all-together in favor of some low-level cardio instead. If RHR is low (good) and HRV is also low (bad), I proceed with caution and wait to see how things progress during warm-up sets and the first working set. If the working set wasn’t terribly difficult, I add more sets. If it’s an exceedingly difficult set, I walk away (session over).

    Thanks for posting the interview.

  2. deekod says:

    Loved the interview thx

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