Early HRV changes relate to the prospective change in VO2max in female soccer players

It’s been a good start to the Thanksgiving break with the  acceptance of our latest study entitled “Initial weekly HRV response is related to the prospective change in VO2max in female soccer players” in IJSM (Abstract below).

We’re currently working on supporting these findings with a much larger sample size in the new year.

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine if the early response in weekly measures of HRV, when derived from a smart-phone application, were related to the eventual change in VO2max following an off-season training program in female soccer athletes. Nine female collegiate soccer players participated in an 11-week off-season conditioning program. In the week immediately before and after the training program, each participant performed a test on a treadmill to determine maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Daily measures of the log-transformed root mean square of successive R-R intervals (lnRMSSD) were performed by the participants throughout week 1 and week 3 of the conditioning program. The mean and coefficient of variation (CV) lnRMSSD values of week 1 showed small (r = -0.13, p= 0.74) and moderate (r = 0.57, p = 0.11), respectively, non-significant correlations to the change in VO2max at the end of the conditioning program (∆VO2max). A significant and near-perfect correlation was found between the change in the weekly mean lnRMSSD values from weeks 1 and 3 (∆lnRMSSDM) and ∆VO2max (r = 0.90, p = 0.002). The current results have identified that the initial change in weekly mean lnRMSSD from weeks 1 to 3 of a conditioning protocol was strongly associated with the eventual adaptation of VO2max.

 

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About hrvtraining

Researcher and Professor. Former coach.
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