New Study: Effects of consecutive domestic and international tournaments on HRV in an elite rugby sevens team

A quick summary of our latest paper follows the abstract below…

Effects of consecutive domestic and international tournaments on
heart rate variability in an elite rugby sevens team

JSAMS title HRV rugby

Rugby seven players often compete in 2-day tournaments over consecutive weekends, leaving only 5 days to recover and prepare for the next tournament. Many tournaments are held internationally, adding substantial travel demands to the already-taxing nature of the sport. We hypothesized that the added stress of travel for an international tournament may result in greater decrements in HRV relative to a local tournament.

The main findings were that despite no significant difference in match-physical demands (high speed running, total distance and sRPE), significant reductions in LnRMSSD were observed only in response to the international tournament (see figure below). Despite non-significant p values at other time-points, individual analysis showed that ~80% of the players showed meaningful reductions in LnRMSSD relative to baseline following the local tournament and on the day of travel (see bottom of figure). Thus, it seems that HRV was still affected by these events, though to a lesser magnitude than the international tournament.

The decrements in LnRMSSD at the international tournament were preceded by significant decrements in perceived sleep quality and energy levels reported on or after a chaotic travel day. The travel day involved an earlier than usual wake-time and a missed flight connection. This forced the team to complete the travel by bus, delaying their hotel arrival to 3 am.

Given that HRV is sensitive to a variety of physiological, psychological and environmental factors, we cannot say for certain that travel stress accounted for the differences in HRV responses, though it seems likely. We state: “LnRMSSD responses to the international tournament were therefore likely influenced by a combination of variables associated with, but not limited to altered sleep, a disrupted travel itinerary and the process of relocation which interacted with the physical and psychological stress associated with tournament-play.”

Differences in collision/body contact loads between tournaments may have contributed to differences in LnRMSSD responses, but were not assessed. Additionally, this was the first pair of consecutive tournaments for this team in at least six weeks, which may have served as a relatively novel stimulus. Therefore, we’re not sure if similar LnRMSSD responses would be observed when the team was re-familiarized with consecutive tournaments or when travel isn’t so hectic.

JSAMS Fig 1 HRV rugby 7 consecutive tournaments Flatt et al.

Effects of varying training load on HRV and running performance among an Olympic rugby sevens team

This study is the first of a few collaborations between Dan Howells and I involving HRV in elite rugby sevens players. Here we evaluated HRV and running performance responses  to peak training loads during preparation for the 2016 Olympic games. A practical summary follows the abstract below.

Effects of varying training load on HRV and running performance among an Olympic rugby sevens team

JSAMS Abstract Flatt Howells HRV rugby sevens

How do elite seven’s players respond to substantial increments in training load? Based on previous studies, we’d expect the weekly LnRMSSD mean (LnRMSSDm) to decrease and the coefficient of variation (LnRMSSDcv) to increase relative to baseline. We’ve observed this in collegiate soccer players and sprint-swimmers.

In contrast to this hypothesis, the players showed no change in LnRMSSDmean throughout two weeks of intensified training relative to a baseline week of low loads. LnRMSSDcv demonstrated a small increase during the first week of increased load (expected response) but then showed a moderate decrease during the second week of increased load, which involved greater loads than the previous week (unexpected response).

No change (or an increase) in LnRMSSDm and a reduction in LnRMSSDcv is typically observed when training loads are reduced. Less training stress results in less fluctuations in LnRMSSD. However, these players demonstrated less fluctuation in LnRMSSD despite significant increments in training load.

The discrepancy here appears to be related to how players are tolerating and adapting to the training load. We often assume that increased loads will result in fatigue accumulation and temporary negative responses. However, these elite players demonstrated no reductions in subjective indicators of recovery status during the weeks of increased load. Additionally, there was no significant decrement in running performance (maximum aerobic speed) mid-way through the intensified microcycles.

Thus, the preservation of autonomic activity (no change in LnRMSSDm) and less fluctuations (reduced LnRMSSDcv) seem to reflect a postive coping response to the training. In fact, individuals who demonstrated the lowest LnRMSSDcv during week 1 of increased load showed the most favorable changes in running performance (r = -0.74).

This is yet another study that demonstrates that reduced fluctuations in LnRMSSD (i.e., decrease in LnRMSSDcv) is associated with positive training responses in athletes.

The Practical Implications of the study were:

•When evaluated as a group, LnRMSSDcv may be a more sensitive training response marker than LnRMSSDm during training load variations among elite players.

•LnRMSSDcv did not display a linear dose–response relationship with training load. Rather, LnRMSSDcv seems to reflect an adaptive physiological response to the imposed training stimulus which may be useful for identifying individuals responding undesirably to training.

•Elite rugby players presenting large day-to-day fluctuations in LnRMSSD in response to training load variation should be monitored closely for performance decrements, particularly when nearing important competitions.

 

 

 

 

Modelling the HRV Response to Training Loads in Elite Rugby Sevens Players

New paper in collaboration with my colleagues Sean Williams, Dan Howells et al. Full-text link below.

Modelling the HRV Response to Training Loads in Elite Rugby Sevens Players

Key Points

  • A systems theory approach can be used to describe the variation in chronic HRV responses to training within elite Rugby Sevens players.
  • For the majority of athletes, model parameters can be used to accurately predict future responses to training stimuli.
  • Responses that diverge from the predicted values may serve as a useful flag for the investigation of changes in lifestyle factors.
  • Internal training load measures (sRPE) markedly outperformed external load measures (HSD) in predicting future HRV responses to training stimuli.

Abstract

A systems modelling approach can be used to describe and optimise responses to training stimuli within individuals. However, the requirement for regular maximal performance testing has precluded the widespread implementation of such modelling approaches in team-sport settings. Heart rate variability (HRV) can be used to measure an athlete’s adaptation to training load, without disrupting the training process. As such, the aim of the current study was to assess whether chronic HRV responses, as a representative marker of training adaptation, could be predicted from the training loads undertaken by elite Rugby Sevens players. Eight international male players were followed prospectively throughout an eight-week pre-season period, with HRV and training loads (session-RPE [sRPE] and high-speed distance [HSD]) recorded daily. The Banister model was used to estimate vagallymediated chronic HRV responses to training loads over the first four weeks (tuning dataset); these estimates were then used to predict chronic HRV responses in the subsequent four-week period (validation dataset). Across the tuning dataset, high correlations were observed between modelled and recorded HRV for both sRPE (r = 0.66 ± 0.32) and HSD measures (r = 0.69 ± 0.12). Across the sRPE validation dataset, seven of the eight athletes met the criterion for validity (typical error <3% and Pearson r >0.30), compared to one athlete in the HSD validation dataset. The sRPE validation data produced likely lower mean bias values, and most likely higher Pearson correlations, compared to the HSD validation dataset. These data suggest that a systems theory approach can be used to accurately model chronic HRV responses to internal training loads within elite Rugby Sevens players, which may be useful for optimising the training process on an individual basis.

New Study: Intra- and inter-day reliability of ultra-short-term HRV in elite rugby union players

Here’s a look at our latest study in collaboration with Fabio Nakamura and colleagues, now in press with JSCR (Abstract below). In this study, HRV was recorded as a team at the training facility, not immediately after waking. This is the approach that many coaches are interested in using given the issue with compliance when trying to get athletes to perform HRV measures on their own at home after waking. Controlled and supervised measures at the facility appear promising, at least in these high level athletes.

It’s important to understand that autonomic activity is constantly making adjustments to physical, chemical and perceived psychological stimuli. Thus, HRV is inherently not the most reliable metric. However, training status/fitness appear to have a strong affect on day to day variation in HRV. More fit athletes recover faster/tolerate training better and thus tend to show less deviation from baseline compared to less fit athletes, of which will experience much greater homeostatic disruption from training and greater day to day variation. I strongly believe that the amount of daily fluctuation (i.e., lnRMSSDcv) is a very useful indication of fitness, stress and training adaptation.

We currently have a paper in production looking at the effect of training status on HRV. In the mean time, compare the trends below of an Olympic level and a conference level athlete, both short-distance swimmers (similar age and physical characteristics) across 4 consecutive weeks of training.

lnrmssd compareIntra- and inter-day reliability of ultra-short-term heart rate variability in rugby union players.

The aim of this study was to examine the intra-day and inter-day reliability of ultra-short-term vagal-related heart rate variability (HRV) in elite rugby union players. Forty players from the Brazilian National Rugby Team volunteered to participate in this study. The natural log of the root mean square of successive RR interval differences (lnRMSSD) assessments were performed on four different days. HRV was assessed twice (intra-day reliability) on the first day and once per day on the following three days (inter-day reliability). The RR interval recordings were obtained from 2-min recordings using a portable heart rate monitor. The relative reliability of intra- and inter-day lnRMSSD measures were analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The typical error of measurement (absolute reliability) of intra- and inter-day lnRMSSD assessments were analyzed using the coefficient of variation (CV). Both intra-day (ICC = 0.96; CV = 3.99%) and inter-day (ICC = 0.90; CV = 7.65%) measures were highly reliable. The ultra-short-term lnRMSSD is a consistent measure for evaluating elite rugby union players, in both intra- and inter-day settings. This study provides further validity to using this shortened method in practical field conditions with highly trained team sports athletes.

Full text on Research Gate